Get Ready for a New Season of Culinary Arts Courses at Phipps



Culinary classes are back in 2022 at Phipp’s Conservatory with delicious new adventures for you. Craft homemade pasta, enjoy a Valentine's Day-themed date night, create an easy meal of soup and quick breads and so much more.


This season, classes will be available for in-person and virtual sessions. For in-person classes, class size will be limited to allow for adequate social distancing during class. Masks are required for all guests for in-person classes. For virtual classes, grocery pick up is available, making it even easier for you to cook along.


For more details about Phipp’s programs, or to receive personalized class recommendations from its helpful staff, contact edu@phipps.conservatory.org. To sign up for culinary classes, visit https://www.phipps.conservatory.org/classes-and-programs/for-adults/culinary-arts.


Taste of the Season: January: Grain Bowl

Virtual | Thurs., Jan. 6; 6 – 7:30 p.m. Eating seasonally means getting the freshest food that is not only beneficial for your health, but for the environment too. Join Chef Emily this winter in tasting the seasons and learning to create dishes from the freshest, and therefore tastiest, ingredients around.



Fresh Pasta from Scratch: Farfalle with Garlic Aioli Sauce

In-Person | Wed., Feb. 2; 6 – 8 p.m. Join Chef Rachel Homan to learn the tricks and tips to making fresh pasta at home in a variety of shapes and flavors along with homemade sauces and sides.



Soups and Quick Breads: Thai Red Curry Noodle Soup with Pan Fried Roti

Virtual | Thurs., Feb. 17; 6 – 7:30 p.m. Take advantage of the cold winter weather to get extra cozy and warm in the kitchen. Chef Emily will help you create a flavor filled dish of Thai red curry noodle soup with pan fried roti as your bread accompaniment.



The History Is on the Plate: Deconstructing African American Food History

Free Virtual Event | Wed., Feb. 23; 7 – 8 p.m. In this special event, American culinary historian Dr. Jessica B. Harris will discuss eight plants and their connections to and importance in African American history and culture.


14 views0 comments